Are there no women in Appiatse? 
As a country, Ghana is plagued by many of the ills of developing countries such as open gutters, open defecation and open urination. Since we fail to tell our own story and we sit down for others to set the tone for what our story is, or should be, it is the pungent stories that hold sway.

Introduction

As a country, Ghana is plagued by many of the ills of developing countries such as open gutters, open defecation and open urination. Since we fail to tell our own story and  we sit down for others to set the tone for what our story is, or should be, it is the pungent stories that hold sway. Sometimes, we see these stories on international media platforms and we begin to feel that such stories represent our divine destiny. So, what do we do? We pick our cameras and look for similar stories to show on our own local stations to feed and validate outsiders’ jaundiced and prejudiced preconceptions about us. If we have not paid attention to these, let us watch the pre-6.pm or 7p.m main news bulletin introductory videos on TV. In a contest of infamy, GTV’s Adult Education series introductory footage will do well.

 

The fact is, we have many fine stories to tell. One area that we need to be celebrating is our swift action when it comes to signing international treaties, conventions and agreements. It is on record that Ghana was the first country in the world to sign the International Convention of the Rights of the Child.[1] Ghana was also the 6th country in the world to sign and ratify the statute that brought about the International Criminal Court.[2] Not bad at all, considering that almighty United States has not signed, much more ratified, these important international documents.

 

Ghana and international women’s rights

With specific reference to the promotion of women’s rights on the international plane, Ghana has done a fantastic job, too. For instance, Ghana has signed and ratified the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)[3] and The Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People's Rights (ACHPR) on the Rights of Women in Africa,[4] among several others. The CEDAW is perhaps, the most comprehensive of all international treaties on the promotion of women's rights in the world. It specifically provides that countries that have signed on to the Convention must have Affirmative Action laws to ensure women’s full participation in decision making at all levels of governance.  

 

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