The Law and Politics of Natural Black Hair: Marghuy on my mind.
This article further raises the issue as to why in the face of a blatant abuse of a child’s right to education, most of the usual human rights adherents and diplomats are quiet.

A: Introduction

The art of formulating a title for my blog articles is generally a straightforward one. Mostly, in the process of ruminating on the subject-matter of the article, the title will cross my mind and I’ll jot it down. No further autopsy may be conducted on it and it may pass without much fuss. Not so with the instant article. All the likely titles that came to mind were too numerous to make for easy choice. So, I frustratingly settled on the instant title – “The Law and Politics of Natural Black Hair”. I was amused at first because it sounded more like the title of an Introductory Course in African Identity being offered to first year students in a richly-endowed university in Europe or US. If for nothing at all, such a course of study on the menu of any Anglo-Saxon or euro-centric university could induct it into the ‘non-racist’ Hall of Fame. In spite of my anxiety that the title reeked of academia, I agreed with myself to stick with it. The reason is that, the article touches on the ongoing tussle between natural black hair and the law in the courts and the general politics and economics of natural black hair in our ‘globalized’ world. The article further raises the issue as to why in the face of a blatant abuse of a child’s right to education, most of the usual human rights adherents and diplomats are quiet. Finally, the article urges that once the High Court has given its judgment in favour of natural black hair, we should let sleeping dogs lie.  

 

B: To admit or not to admit, that is a foolish question

There are many countries in the world that toot their horns these days as the ‘mothers’ of democracy, freedom and equality. But as students of history and law, we know that those countries had to confront and challenge most of their obnoxious long-held beliefs and perceptions in court before they arrived at where they are today.

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10 thoughts on “The Law and Politics of Natural Black Hair: Marghuy on my mind.

  1. Awesome write-up! Kudos on a great article once again.

    I have never understood the rule of keeping our natural hair short that we enforce in our Senior High Schools. It would have made more sense if the rules were against wearing of wigs in schools.
    Speaking from a personal experience, I really hated my natural hair because of this and that made me rush to relax and braid my hair as soon as I was out of school. Thank God I have now embraced it.

    We need to re-visit some of these rules we keep so dear to our hearts and make the necessary changes.

  2. Great piece! It is sad that we still have those colonial era rules and regulations to deal with in the 21st century. Sadly, human rights groups don’t take up issue like this because it is not in the interest of the donors.

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